THE CROSSROAD OF FOUR CONFESSIONS

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It is an interactive collage of documentary audio clips about the Park of Peace (Old Kaunas Cemetery), created by the KOSMOS THEATRE and presented with Kaunas2022 at Kaunas History Festival. 


The audio performance is presented to viewers in the form of a mobile app using the phone's GPS signal, allowing listeners to physically walk through the creators' geography of sounds and stories, discover unexpected locations in the park, and hear their stored park stories at their own convenience. Dozens of authentic documentaries and professional history recorded by the professional actors, along with accompanying music and sound design, will guide listeners through the religious-cultural traditions of all four denominations located in the park, the famous Christmas Day events, . The director of the project Žilvinas Vingelis, a student of Gintaras Varnas, a composer and sound designer, is a winner of various contests and awards. awarded the Young Artist Prize Mykolas Natalevičius. 

RECONCILIATION

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KAUNAS - THE MINKOVSKY BROTHERS' ORIGIN 

An interactive audio audition at the confluence of the Neris and the Nemunas, exploring the scientific legacy of world-famous brothers Oskar and Herman Minkovsky who spent their childhood years in Kaunas and their influence on world-class scientific discoveries. 1858-1931) - Born in Kaunas, German pathophysiologist, therapist, lecturer at various universities around the world, who started insulin (curing diabetes), his younger brother Herman Minkowski (1864-1909) - the first German mathematician and physicist who raised four-dimensional space (also called "Minkovsky space"), which gave birth to Albert Einstein's theory of realism, formulated the world-famous geometric number theory called "Minkovsky's problem" and was the first to name the four-dimensional force often called "Minkovsky's force". 

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The KOSMOS APP "Reconciliation" program, co-produced with the IX Fort Memorial Museum, will aim to bring people of different races, nations, movements, ideologies and religions to one of the most painful places in Lithuania. Reconciling with the past to build the new world not from a collapsed new one, but from lessons learned. During World War II, over 300,000 people, more than half of them Jews, were massacred in the 9th Fort Meomorlian Museum. 

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